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One of the Guardian Unlimited Books' top 10 literary blogs: "A home-grown treasure ... smart, serious analysis"

The Bookaholics' Guide to Book Blogs: "Mark Thwaite ... has a maverick, independent mind"

Wednesday 14 February 2007

Cost of Iraq War

Whenever a politician or government minister says "we can't afford that" they are lying. Full stop. If they want to afford it, they can afford it. The price tag for the Iraq War (via 3 Quarks, quoting John Allen Paulos in his Who's Counting column at ABC News) is now estimated at $700 billion ...


... $700 billion in direct costs and perhaps twice that much when indirect expenditures are included. Cost estimates vary — Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz puts the total cost at more than $2 trillion — but let's be conservative and say it's only $1 trillion (in today's dollars).

As a number of other commentators have recently written, this number — a 1 followed by 12 zeroes — can be put into perspective in various ways. Given how large the war looms, it doesn't hurt to repeat this simple exercise with other examples and in other ways.

There are many comparisons that might be made, and devising new governmental monetary units is one way to make them. Consider, for example, that the value of one EPA, the annual budget of the Environmental Protection Agency, is about $7.5 billion. The cost of the Iraq War is thus more than a century's worth of EPA spending (in today's dollars), almost 130 EPAs, only a small handful of which would probably have been sufficient to clean up Superfund sites around the country.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
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Reader Comments

Wednesday 14 February 2007

Michael Richards says...

This information, coming the same day as UNICEF's report on children in the world's richest countries in which Britain's poor performance was blamed on "under-investment and a 'dog eat dog' attitude in society", shows where this government's priorities lie. Who, during the Thatcher years, would have thought this would emerge under a Labour administration?

Sunday 18 February 2007

GERRY SOMERS says...

I cannot believe it that your country has spent such a huge amount of money in Iraq when there is so much poverty and inequality in your own country. If in Ireland we spent a proportionate amount on a similar venture the government would collapse in days!Thats the view from over here anyway.Live long and prosperGerry.

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Serendipoetry

Memorial Tablet

Squire nagged and bullied till I went to fight,
(Under Lord Derby’s Scheme). I died in hell—
(They called it Passchendaele). My wound was slight,
And I was hobbling back; and then a shell
Burst slick upon the duck-boards: so I fell
Into the bottomless mud, and lost the light.

At sermon-time, while Squire is in his pew,
He gives my gilded name a thoughtful stare:
For, though low down upon the list, I’m there;
‘In proud and glorious memory’... that’s my due.
Two bleeding years I fought in France, for Squire:
I suffered anguish that he’s never guessed.
Once I came home on leave: and then went west...
What greater glory could a man desire?

-- Siegfried Sassoon
Collected Poems (Faber and Faber)

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The Dord, the Diglot, and an Avocado or two

Pre-order Anu Garg's new book: The Dord, the Diglot, and an Avocado or Two: The Hidden Lives and Strange Origins of Common and Not-So-Common Words (ISBN 9780452288614), published by Penguin more …

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