Blog Roll

Anecdotal Evidence
AuthorStore
Biology of the Worst Kind
The Book Depository Editor's Corner
Book World
BOOKSURFER
Buzzwords Blog: 3AM Magazine
Castrovalva
CruelestMonth.com
Dialogic
Edward Champion's Return of the Reluctant
The Elegant Variation
Fernham
John Baker's Blog
KR Blog
languagehat.com
the Literary Saloon
Long Sunday
MadInkBeard - Updates
The Midnight Bell
Mountain*7
Nomadics
pas au-delà
The Reading Experience
scarecrow
signandsight.com
splinters: books, authors, literature, travel, politics
Spurious
Tales from the Reading Room
This Space
University of Nebraska Press
Waggish
Weblog - A Don's Life - Times Online
Weblog - Peter Stothard - Times Online
Powered by Bloglines

ReadySteadyBlog

One of the Guardian Unlimited Books' top 10 literary blogs: "A home-grown treasure ... smart, serious analysis"

The Bookaholics' Guide to Book Blogs: "Mark Thwaite ... has a maverick, independent mind"

Blog entries for 'May 2007'

Thursday 31 May 2007

Yo, Blair!

I just did a wee, capsule review of Geoffrey Wheatcroft's Yo, Blair! over at The Book Depository:


Geoffrey Wheatcroft's Yo, Blair! is a caustic, bitter satire of Tony Blair and his ten terrible years in power: "a blast on the trumpet about the most disastrous premiership of modern times." The title, of course, refers to that totemic moment when the American President George Bush greeted Blair with those eponymous words at the St. Petersburg summit in 2006. Spun as merely a friendly acknowledgement, the phrase seemed to indicate so much more: Blair was subservient to Bush in every way. The ruinous war in Iraq, that Blair backed knowing full well it was illegal, showed that when the Americans said jump, Blair blindly rushed forward to shout how high. Wheatcroft shows that the "calamitous Blair decade" has been defined by absurd foreign adventures: "While Blair is not a fascist himself ... he and his party have continually if unconciously echoed the language of fascism." This is an often funny book, but the humour is black and the tone is angry. Yo, Blair! is very well done; biting satire is the very least Blair deserves.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Thursday 31 May 2007

Separated by a common language

Nice: separated by a common language -- "Observations on British and American English by an American linguist in the UK." (I can now spell "separate" correctly each time I type it because Mrs Book, a teacher, told me t'other day that "there is a rat in separate" -- genius!)

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Wednesday 30 May 2007

3:AM Brasil

3:AM Magazine have just launched 3:AM Brasil, a Portuguese-language version of the site dedicated to new writing, music and culture from Brazil.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Tuesday 29 May 2007

The Annandale Dream Gazette

What is the Annandale Dream Gazette? The poet Robert Kelly explains:


Some believe the dream comes from the gods. Some believe that the dream comes from the ancestors. Some believe that dreams come from a part of the dreamer’s self usually remote or removed from consciousness. Some believe that dreams are scraps of memory and fantasy, remnants of the day. All of these beliefs are probably true enough in their ways, and certainly all have been productive of creative and analytic results. Scriptures and assassinations, benzene rings and orphic odes arise from dreams.

What if the dream is something else as well? Not individual, not a message from God or from the archetypes or from the soul. We hear Freudians speak of the language of dream, but what if dream is language, is language the way language is language: systematic, intentional, focused on saying something. What if dream is above all, exactly as language is, social. This is the aspect of the dream that is seldom considered, dream as arising from the speaking back into a community, a community of native dreamers (so to say).

It was to examine the idea that a dream seeks an intended audience outside the dreamer, that the Annandale Dream Gazette was founded years ago. The dreamer dreams towards someone—and that someone is within the community. Thus two goals are achieved by harvesting the night’s dreams and publishing them: the dream may find its intended hearer, and we may gradually come to learn the nature and shape of the community itself, the community into which one dreams.

So: the dream is public. The dream is social. The dream is communication. The dream intends to speak to you. These are the notions to investigate.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Tuesday 29 May 2007

The Post Punk Kitchen

Nice: The Post Punk Kitchen. (Via Grub Street who have just published Isa Chandra Moskowitz's Vegan with a Vengeance.)

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Tuesday 29 May 2007

Withnail and I

The Withnail and I script is online (via Mountain*7). My favourite bit is right at the end when Withnail quotes Hamlet:


I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame the earth seems to me a sterile promotory; this most excellent canopy the air, look you, this mighty o'rehanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire; why, it appeareth nothing to me but a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. What a piece of work is a man, how noble in reason, how infinite in faculties, how like an angel in aprehension, how like a God! The beauty of the world, paragon of animals; and yet to me, what is this quintessence of dusk. Man delights not me, no, nor women neither, nor women neither.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Tuesday 29 May 2007

Eeeeek!

I've just posted a wonderful review of Tao Lin's Eeeee Eee Eeee, entitled the The Necessary Alien, by the matchless Stephen Mitchelmore.


And a nice, chunky interview with Peter Robertson (an associate editor of the Mad Hatters' Review).

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Monday 28 May 2007

Grass essay

Chris over at Splinters points me to an essay in The New Yorker by Gunter Grass entitled How I Spent The War. This will be how I spend my evening!

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Friday 25 May 2007

Weekend reads


Lovely, German Buddenbrooks cover (via Charkin's Blog)


Aah, a long weekend ahead. So, what to do? Well, check the weather forecast and walk Lola the puppy for starters. But after that, thoughts inevitably turn to reading. No doubt I'll finish Antonio Tabucchi's It's Getting Later All the Time (translated from the Italian by Alastair McEwen; New Directions), but then I think I'll move on to something by Thomas Mann. Been years since I read Mann. I picked up a nice, old copy of The Holy Sinner t'other day, so maybe I'll read that. Buddenbrooks will have to wait until the summer.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Friday 25 May 2007

Two links

Two links via CruelestMonth:


  • The Continental Review -- "The Web's first Video Forum for Contemporary Poetry and Poetics"
  • BooksPrice.com -- finds the "best price for new & used books and textbooks at major online stores."

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Thursday 24 May 2007

Tom on the telly

A link: Tom McCarthy's novel Remainder being discussed on RTE Television's The View.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Thursday 24 May 2007

Rourke reads with Litt

Lee "Scarecrow" Rourke is reading with Toby Litt this evening in Big London. More information via 3:AM.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Thursday 24 May 2007

Rosalind Belben

I've just posted a great interview with Rosalind Belben: go read!

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Wednesday 23 May 2007

Kurp on Appelfeld

Patrick Kurp on Aharon Appelfeld over at Anecdotal Evidence:


The Israeli novelist Aharon Appelfeld was born in 1932 in Romania. Eight years later the Nazis seized Czernowitz, his home town, killed his mother and deported Appelfeld and his father to a concentration camp in the Ukraine. He escaped and remained a fugitive for three years before joining the Red Army. Read some of the details the details in The Story of a Life, his emblematic chronicle of 20th-century horrors narrated by a voice as quiet and oblique as the voices in his novels. Where Piotr Rawicz, another Holocaust survivor, narrates scenes of unbearable cruelty in Blood from the Sky, Appelfeld’s aesthetic remains rooted in indirection. Even when his narrative is dry and fatual, a mist clings to his words. I can’t think of another novel in which so much is left so eloquently unsaid as Badenheim 1939.

I met Appelfeld 20 years ago at a holocaust conference I was covering as a reporter. He was soft-spoken, laconic, avuncular. I introduced myself and we talked. I no longer have my notes but I remember how disarming his affability seemed. Did this explain his aesthetic, his reliance on absence as presence? How could a boy who lived by his wits from age 8 turn into so gracious a man?

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Wednesday 23 May 2007

Recent reads


Nice, old Faber cover (via william-golding.co.uk)


I note I've not really said, of late, what I've been reading. Well, lots of things, of course, but the books that stick in the mind include William Golding's Pincher Martin (a lovely old Faber paperback I picked up in a local charity shop; the latest incarnation, you'll note, has a truly awful cover design), Dan Hind's The Threat to Reason (Verso; Dan's book is a wonderful antidote to the idiocies of Euston Manifesto-type pillocks and I'll be doing a lot to recommend in the coming weeks), and Roberto Bolaño's Amulet (New Directions; and one of my Books of the Week you'll have noted). The Bolaño oddly reminded me of Richard Brautigan; something both casual and heart-wrenching about the writing.


Update: Actually, I've just posted a tiny, capsule review of Pincher Martin over on The Book Depository which reads:

Whenever William Golding's name is invoked, we recall his dystopian, best-selling classic Lord of the Flies. That novel, first published in 1954, has sold millions of copies worldwide, including more than 25 million in English alone. But Golding's skill as a truly modern writer is better showcased in his most perfectly realised work, his masterful third novel Pincher Martin. The story of a shipwrecked sailor, set at the time of World War Two, it is also an existential quest into our anti-hero Christopher Martin's sense of himself, of his past actions (including violently forcing himself on a female friend) and his gathering awareness of what is really happening to him as he tries to survive on an outcrop in the middle of the Atlantic ocean, drinking from rock pools, eating whatever he can find, and fighting for his life and his sanity.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Wednesday 23 May 2007

Publishing gossip

I've been wandering the country meeting publishers again: last week I was down in Big London (seeing Hesperus, Faber, Random House, Dalkey and Penguin -- and running into friends who work for Peter Owen and Verso); yesterday I was in Oxford (OUP, of course!)


Mostly, I've been meeting folk with my Book Depository hat on, talking about business stuff, but, as you'd expect, there has been much chatter about blogging too (the excellent American-based OUPblog is well worth checking out if you don't know it). And whenever book people get together there is, inevitably, blather about books as well: Dalkey keep telling me wonderful things about Aidan Higgins; Peter Owen are excited about Anna Kavan's Guilty (some great photographs of Kavan over on the Peter Owen blog, btw).


Interesting gossip garnered (well, nothing very juicy I'm afraid): Hesperus are finding their feet with their new blog (which I wrote about over on Editor's Corner earlier today); OUP's American-based blog is soon to add British voices to the mix; Faber are working on an improved website as we speak; and Random House are just about to launch rbooks.co.uk ("the official book shop for The Random House Group").

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Monday 21 May 2007

New Zealand Poet Laureate Award

A New Zealand Poet Laureate Award is to be established to recognise writers who have made an outstanding contribution to New Zealand poetry (via scoop.co.nz; thanks Bill):


"Poetry is an important part of New Zealand art and culture," said National Library Minister Judith Tizard. "In funding this new award, the Labour-led government is acknowledging the value that New Zealanders’ place on poetry and literature as a part of our national identity," Judith Tizard said.

The New Zealand Poet Laureate Award will be established and administered by the National Library of New Zealand. A Laureate will be selected biennially and receive an award of $50,000.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Wednesday 16 May 2007

Around the 'sphere

A few links for you:


  • The Millions blog on Clive James (via enowning):

    To the extent that they endorsed or downplayed (respectively) totalitarian regimes, Heidegger and Sartre could be seen to have fallen short of their own philosophies. But to reach this nuanced verdict, one has to have actually tried to understand the philosophies in question, and James can't be bothered with philosophy (not a great quality in a cultural critic). Even Hegel and Kant get his goat. I had always thought of the anti-intellectualism and paranoia as a combination peculiar to the American far right, but apparently it can afflict Aussie humanists, too.

  • Benjamin Markovits on Henry James: The Complete Letters:

    The fact that we still like him as much in his confident maturity as we did in his hesitant youth may have something to do with the sweet, dull, generous, loving loneliness of the role he has been cast in here: a man on his own, thinking of others, and sitting down to write them a letter.

  • The US-based initiative Reading The World is back this June:

    Reading The World is an exciting collaboration between booksellers and publishers interested in bringing international voices to the attention of readers like you. As a result, throughout the month of June and beyond, many independent bookstores across the country will be displaying the titles found on the following pages. These forty books represent some of the most exciting literature being written outside the United States. From Lithuania to Iraq, from Norway to Chile, the writers offer an excellent introduction to a variety of cultures and ideas found outside our borders—ideas and cultures that we must have access to in order to understand our world.

  • On July 3rd, to mark the publication of her novel Guilty, Peter Owen are going to hold an Anna Kavan evening at the London Review Bookshop. Brain Aldiss, Doris Lessing Virginia Ironside and Christopher Priest will be holding a panel discussion about Kavan's life and work amidst a few brief readings.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Monday 14 May 2007

Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize

The Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize "aims to honour the craft of translation, and to recognise its cultural importance." The shortlist for the prize was announced a week or so back; the winner will be announced on the 6th June. Let us hope Michael Hofmann wins for his work on Durs Grunbein's Ashes for Breakfast: Selected Poems.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: , ,

Monday 14 May 2007

Nomadics back

Pierre Joris's Nomadics blog is back after a couple of months of silence with details of a new book of poems from Pierre called Aljibar. (For those interested, it can be purchased directly from the publisher, Editions PHI, or, starting in late June, from the Canadian co-publisher, Editions des Forges, or, directly via Ta'wil Productions.)

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Friday 11 May 2007

Snow Part

Some really exciting news from Carcanet: Snow Part by Paul Celan, translated by Ian Fairley, is to be published by them later this month:


A few months before his death, Paul Celan described Schneepart as his 'strongest and boldest' book. A response to the turbulent events of 1968 - the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, the attempted assassination of a student leader in Berlin - the collection is haunted by images of earlier violence and resistance in a dark European century: the hanging of anti-Hitler conspirators in 1944, the shooting of Rosa Luxembourg in 1919. These are poems of an Ice Age, their terrain the clarity of the limestone alp with its subterranean presence of caves and abysses.

Snow Part is the first translation of Schneepart to be published in English. Its seventy poems were written between December 1967 and October 1968, and published in 1971, a year after Celan's death. To this volume, Ian Fairley adds some twenty posthumously published poems closely linked to Schneepart.

Paul Celan was born in Romania in 1920. In 1938 he visited France as a medical student, returning home in 1939 to study Romance languages and literature. The family was deported in 1942; Celan's parents died in a concentration camp and Celan was conscripted into a series of labour camps until 1944. He escaped, survived a period in a labour camp and eventually settled in Paris where he taught and wrote. After the war he emigrated to Bucharest, where he worked as a translator. He escaped to Vienna in 1947, and settled in Paris in 1948, the same year in which his first collection of poetry was published. In 1958 Celan was awarded the Bremen Literature Prize, and in 1960 the Georg Büchner Prize. He committed suicide in Paris in April 1970.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Thursday 10 May 2007

Marxism and Children's Literature 2

What are you doing on Saturday 9th June? Michael Rosen has just written to tell me about a conference called Marxism and Children's Literature 2:


Following last year's successful initiating conference (March 23 2006) at the University of Hertfordshire, there will be a second in what is hoped will be an annual event. The obituaries of Marxism continue to appear but sightings have been reported all over the world. Whether it is in biographies of writers, analyses of epochs, explanations for the appearance of new forms and themes, critics persist in finding ways to connect writers and their works to the stresses and strains of the societies that nourished them.

Alan Gibbons and Michael Rosen will discuss critiques of government approaches to the teaching of children's literature. Authors Ann Turnbull, China Mieville, Jonathan Neale and Alan Gibbons will talk about their work.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Thursday 10 May 2007

Hofmann on Herbert

Via Patrick Kurp's Anecdotal Evidence:


The poet-translator Michael Hofmann reviews The Collected Poems: 1956-1998, by Zbigniew Herbert, in the May issue of Poetry. Hofmann idolizes Herbert but eviscerates his latest translator, Alissa Valles, and addresses the question of why John and Bogdana Carpenter, Herbert's longtime translators, were not given the task. Here's a sample of Hofmann's rage:

"Alissa Valles's Herbert is slack, chattersome, hysterical, full of exaggeration, complacency, and reaching for effect. The original (I'm quite sure) is none of those things. This Collected Poems is a hopelessly, irredeemably bad book. The only solution to its problems would be a bulk reinstatement of the old translations. These things matter so much; it would be nice if they made a difference."

Hofmann goes on to say: 


"New translation" is never the infallible trump that publishers sometimes wish (do they ever believe it?) when they are driven to play it. Old translations hang around, even when they are notionally superseded or replaced, even when they have been discredited, which again is manifestly not the case here. Constance Garnett's Tolstoy, Scott-Moncrieff's Proust, Edwin and Willa Muir's Kafka, H.T. Lowe-Porter's Thomas Mann—all have their adherents. Notable instances in poetry would include the Rilke of J.B. Leishman or C.F. MacIntyre, and the Cavafy of Edmund Keeley and Phillip Sherard. As the song has it, the first cut is the deepest.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: , ,

Wednesday 09 May 2007

Murray's Rack Press

A note from Nicholas Murray about some Rack Press titles:


The Welsh poetry pamphlet imprint, Rack Press, which was relaunched in January 2006, with pamphlets by John Barnie, Richard Price, and Nicholas Murray, issued three new pamphlet titles earlier this year which are selling well*. These are Eight by Five, epigrams from Peter Dale; Clockwork Scorpion, an excellent first collection from Hazel Frew, and Inconsequences a sequence by Dai Vaughan who is perhaps better known for his innovative fiction. There are still a few copies left and pamphlets can be ordered from rackpress@nicholasmurray.co.uk

*"selling well" in the British poetry market means that a tiny print-run is not being left on the publisher's hands!

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Wednesday 09 May 2007

You are not going to enjoy reading this book

Richard Duguid has good news over at The Penguin Blog:


There was much excitement in my department, Penguin Copy-Editorial (popularly known as Editorial 2), on Thursday, when final proofs of the new Penguin Classics translation of the Critique of Pure Reason (1781) were signed off. First proofs of Kant's extraordinarily dense and difficult philosophical Meisterwerk arrived in the department on 27 March ... 2001. Yes, after a mere six years, one month and a bit we, along with translator Marcus Weigelt, have finally satisfied ourselves that all is well with the text and that printing can now commence (though in a fit of nervousness over when we might actually finish, the publication date was last year moved to November 2007, so you'll have to wait a while to get your hands on a copy).

Richard goes to to praise translator Weigelt's introduction:


While the text itself might be too much for most of us to stomach, the translator's introduction is a work of comic genius. The opening few pages are some of the funniest I've read. At least in a Classics introduction. Unlike most intros, this one tells it to you straight: 'You are not going to enjoy reading this book. No one ever has. Even professional philosophers can't hack it.' Which is strange, because of course it's hugely influential and significant.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Tuesday 08 May 2007

Tom McCarthy's top 10 European modernists

An unusually good day over at the Guardian. First, Lee's piece on Ann Quin, and now we also have Tom McCarthy's top 10 European modernists. About Maurice Blanchot, Tom says:


Nobody has better thought through the question of what literature fundamentally is than this man: it's a non-space, a vanishing, a being-towards-death. Blanchot was lined up in front of a Nazi firing squad in 1944, but was reprieved at the last minute and lived, albeit as a virtual recluse, until 2003, endlessly narrating the unnameable disaster - of history, thought, writing itself.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Tuesday 08 May 2007

Rourke on Quin

Scarecrow boss, Mr Lee Rourke, has a nice piece on Ann Quin over at the Guardian:


Quin was born in 1936 in Brighton, one of our more interesting seaside towns (she died there too in 1973: swimming out to sea one morning by Brighton Pier never to return to our shores again). Four books were published in her lifetime: Berg (1964), Three (1966), Passages (1969), and finally Tripticks (1972). Berg is her most famous (and possibly my favourite). It is a paean to the Nouveau Roman of writers like Alain Robbe-Grillet, eschewing the literary trends of her day: those angry, realist campus yawns that put the British working-class voice on the literary map. Ann Quin's was a new British working-class voice that had not been heard before: it was artistic, modern, and - dare I say it - ultimately European. It looked beyond the constructs of our society. It was fresh, alarming, and idiosyncratic. It wasn't static; it moved with the times.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Tuesday 08 May 2007

Roberto Bolaño

A nice pile of books arrives from New Directions, one of my favourite publishers. Included are César Aira's How I Became a Nun (whose Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter I enjoyed so much back in October) and Wilhelm Genazino's The Shoe Tester of Frankfurt ("This brief and poignant novel from Germany explores existential questions as its 46-year-old narrator reflects on broken relationships and other failures, and struggles to come to terms with life.")


Also included is Roberto Bolaño's Amulet. Bolaño is getting a lot of press at the moment for The Savage Detectives (out in the UK in July from Picador). Here is a quote from a recent review in the Washington Post (via 3 Quarks):


Bolaño not only wrote exactly what and how he pleased; he also viciously attacked figures such as Isabel Allende and Octavio Paz, accusing them of being conformists, more interested in fame than in art. In poems, stories (some of them included in his Last Evenings on Earth), novellas (such as Distant Star and By Night in Chile), two mammoth narratives (one under review here and 2666, scheduled for publication next year in English translation), and an essay collection (called, in Spanish, Entre paréntesis), he cultivated such a flamboyant, stylistically distinctive, counter-establishment voice that it's no exaggeration to call him a genius. 

The Savage Detectives alone should grant him immortality. It's an outstanding meditation on art, truth and the search for roots and the self, a kind of road novel set in 1970s Mexico that springs from the same roots as Alfonso Cuarón's film "Y tu mamá también." Its protagonists are Arturo Belano and Ulises Lima, fringe poets professing an aesthetics they describe as "visceral realism." Their hunt for a precursor by the name of Cesárea Tinajero takes them to the Sonora Desert, portrayed by Bolaño as a land of amnesia.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Tuesday 08 May 2007

Hesperus rant

Nice rant from Katya over at the Hesperus Press Blog:


I honestly don’t believe that our society has ‘dumbed down’. I think we as an industry need to provide the range to allow readers to make their own decisions, for god’s sake let someone choose the author with the funny name. And the media need to expand their attentions to more than the books with the largest marketing department behind them.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Monday 07 May 2007

Rosen's Lingua Franca

Tonight, on BBC Radio 3, a new series called Lingua Franca: "Michael Rosen embarks on the long and winding linguistic road through the roots of European language."

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Friday 04 May 2007

Divisadero


Michael Ondaatje, photograph copyright Ulla Montan


At the Booksellers' Association Conference earlier in the week, I picked up a couple of finished copies of Michael Ondaatje's forthcoming novel, Divisadero (published by Bloomsbury and not due out until September). So, who would like my spare copy? Email me, and I'll pop it in the post to you (previous freebie winners are excluded from this "offer"!) Oh, once you've read it, if you could write me a little review, that would be nice.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags: ,

Thursday 03 May 2007

Spinoza on the Beeb

This week's In Our Time (on BBC Radio 4) is about Spinoza:


For the radical thinkers of the Enlightenment, he was the first man to have lived and died as a true atheist. For others, including Samuel Taylor Coleridge, he provides perhaps the most profound conception of God to be found in Western philosophy. He was bold enough to defy the thinking of his time, yet too modest to accept the fame of public office, despite numerous offers, and he died, along with Socrates and Seneca, one of the three great deaths in philosophy. His name is Baruch Spinoza, a Dutch Jewish philosopher from the 17th century, who can claim influence on both the Enlightenment thinkers of the 18th century and great minds of the 19th, notably Hegel, and his ideas were so radical that they could only be fully published after his death.

Posted by Mark Thwaite
Tags:

Submit News to RSB

Please let us know about any literary-related news -- or submit press releases to RSB -- using this form.

-- Mark Thwaite, Managing Editor

Serendipoetry

Omens, after Alexander Pushkin

I rode to meet you: dreams
like living beings swarmed around me
and the moon on my right side
followed me, burning.

I rode back: everything changed.
My soul in love was sad
and the moon on my left side
trailed me without hope.

To such endless impressions
we poets give ourselves absolutely,
making, in silence, omen of mere event,
until the world reflects the deepest needs of the soul.

-- Louise Gluck
Averno (Carcanet Press)

-- View archive

Word of the Day

The Dord, the Diglot, and an Avocado or two

Pre-order Anu Garg's new book: The Dord, the Diglot, and an Avocado or Two: The Hidden Lives and Strange Origins of Common and Not-So-Common Words (ISBN 9780452288614), published by Penguin more …

-- Powered by Wordsmith.org

October's Books of the Month

The New Spirit of Capitalism The New Spirit of Capitalism
Luc Boltanski; Eve Chiapello
Horizons Touched: The Music of ECM Horizons Touched: The Music of ECM
Steve Lake, Paul Griffiths

-- View archive