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One of the Guardian Unlimited Books' top 10 literary blogs: "A home-grown treasure ... smart, serious analysis"

The Bookaholics' Guide to Book Blogs: "Mark Thwaite ... has a maverick, independent mind"

Blog entries on '19 November 2005'

Saturday 19 November 2005

Luciferous Logolepsy

Thanks to the lovely Ross (good luck in your future ventures fella!) for bringing Luciferous Logolepsy to my attention:


Luciferous Logolepsy [is] a collection of over 9,000 obscure english words. Though the definition of an "english" word might seem to be straightforward, it is not. There exist so many adopted, derivative, archaic or abandoned words in what we loosely define as the "English Language", that a clear-cut definition seems impossible. For the purposes of this project though, words are included that may stretch any basic definitions. Particular attention has been paid to archaic words, as they tend to be more evocative - as if their very age lends additional meaning or overtones. Current personal favorites include skirr, epicaricacy and schizothemia.

Posted by Mark Thwaite

Saturday 19 November 2005

Musical matters

Good to see Antony getting an interview in the Guardian. Talking about his favourite singers, he cites Cocteau Twins lead singer, the incomparable Elizabeth Fraser, whose voice accompanied me throughout my teenage years and beyond.


Recently, it has not been either Mr Hegarty or Ms Fraser's singing which has been playing whilst I worked and played, but Einojuhani Rautavaara's Cantus Arcticus, Deaf Centre's Pale Ravine and Tape's Rideau. Fans of Cocteau Twins will want to know, however, that Lullabies To Violaine: Singles and Extended Plays 1982-1996 is just out. Looks like Ms Fraser's voice will soon be reclaiming its rightful place here at RSB Towers after all.

Posted by Mark Thwaite

Saturday 19 November 2005

JH Prynne

Still not 100% sure what I think of JH Prynne ... which is half the pleasure of reading him, of course. On my TBR-pile, Prynne's Poems (2nd edition; Bloodaxe) has been the cause of confusion and delight and frustration, in about equal measures, over the last few months:


JH Prynne is Britain’s leading late Modernist poet. His austere yet playful poetry challenges our sense of the world, not by any direct address to the reader but by showing everything in a different light, enacting slips and changes of meaning through shifting language.

Not since the late work of Ezra Pound and the Maximus series of Charles Olson have the possibilities of poetry been so fundamentally questioned and extended as they are in the life work of JH Prynne. When his Poems was first published in 1999, it was immediately acclaimed as a landmark in modern poetry. This expanded edition includes four later collections only previously available in limited editions.

Posted by Mark Thwaite

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Serendipoetry

Augustus

As you sow, so shall you reap. The bags packed,
Umbers and gold swollen between the purse-strings,
Getaway cars nose on a hot scent.
Under striped canvas the patrons gather,
Staring at blue, incorrigible seas.
The stubble burns a hole in summer's pocket;
Upon the baked crust of their world, the mice
Scatter their ashes to the harvest moon.

-- Peter Scupham
(Carcanet Press)

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Word of the Day

The Dord, the Diglot, and an Avocado or two

Pre-order Anu Garg's new book: The Dord, the Diglot, and an Avocado or Two: The Hidden Lives and Strange Origins of Common and Not-So-Common Words (ISBN 9780452288614), published by Penguin more …

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October's Books of the Month

The New Spirit of Capitalism The New Spirit of Capitalism
Luc Boltanski; Eve Chiapello
Horizons Touched: The Music of ECM Horizons Touched: The Music of ECM
Steve Lake, Paul Griffiths

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